Day 1
28 Feb 2012
Tuesday
Day 2
29 Feb 2012
Wednesday
Day 3
1 March 2012
Thursday
Day 4
2 March 2012
Friday
Registration
(08:30)
Registration
(08:00)
Registration
(08:30)
Registration
(08:30)
Opening Session
(08:45 - 09:00)
   
Tutorial I
Time-Dependent Flow Visualization
(09:00 - 12:00)
Keynote Speech I
Ben Shneiderman
(09:00 - 10:00)

Keynote Speech II
Chandrajit Bajaj
(09:00 - 10:00)

Session 7
Visualization in Medicine and Natural Sciences
(09:00 - 11:00)
Coffee Break
(10:00 - 10:20)
Coffee Break
(10:00 - 10:20)
Coffee Break
(11:00 - 11:30)
Session 1
Information Visualization and Visual Analytics
(10:20 - 12:00)
Session 4
Vector Fields and Flow Visualization I
(10:20 - 12:00)
Closing Session and Best Paper Award
(11:30 - 12:00)

Lunch
(12:00 - 14:00)
Lunch
(12:00 - 13:30)
Lunch
(12:00 - 13:30)
Tutorial II
Interactive Visual Text Analytics and its Evaluation
(14:00 - 16:00)
Session 2
Time and Space (Spatial Temporal Data)
(13:30 - 15:10)
Session 5
Vector Field and Flow Visualization II
(13:30 - 15:00)
 
Coffee Break
(15:10 - 15:30)

Poster Session and Coffee Break
(15:00 - 15:50)
 
Session 3
Graph Visualization
(15:30 - 17:35)

Session 6
Volume Rendering and Illustration
(15:30 - 17:35)
 
*Coffee Breaks at 10:00 & 15:10 on Day 1 Poster Fast Forward
(17:40 - 18:00)
   
Reception
(18:00 - 20:00)
Poster Session
(18:00 - 20:00)
Banquet
(18:00 - 20:30)
 

Keynote Speech I

Challenges for Information Visualization Research: Visual Quality and Data Quantity

by BEN SHNEIDERMAN

Bio:BEN SHNEIDERMAN ( http://www.cs.umd.edu/~ben) is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Founding Director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory (http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/) at the University of Maryland. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, and IEEE, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. Ben is the co-author with Catherine Plaisant of Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (5th ed., 2010) http://www.awl.com/DTUI/. With Stu Card and Jock Mackinlay, he co-authored Readings in Information Visualization: Using Vision to Think (1999). With Ben Bederson he co-authored The Craft of Information Visualization (2003). His book Leonardo's Laptop appeared in October 2002 (MIT Press) and won the IEEE book award for Distinguished Literary Contribution. His latest book, with Derek Hansen and Marc Smith, is Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL (www.codeplex.com/nodexl)

Abstract: The remarkable adoption of information visualization has triggered worldwide application from researchers, companies, governments, and news media. The public interest in visually rich infographics has raised questions of how best to present insights and what interactive capabilities enable engaging exploration, while maintaining comprehensibility. Government professionals find that compelling visual presentations inform policy making. At the same time researchers and corporate decision makers have increased expectations of how visual analytics can support important discoveries and business decisions. Our research community is racing to deal with complex data, rich questions, and large-scale data streams. This talk will present some success stories and suggest promising research directions.

Keynote Speech II

Quantitative Visualization in the Computational Biological Sciences

by CHANDRAJIT BAJAJ

Bio: Chandrajit Bajaj is the director of the Center for Computational Visualization, in the Institute for Computational and Engineering Sciences (ICES) and a Professor of Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. Bajaj holds the Computational Applied Mathematics Chair in Visualization. He is also an affiliate faculty member of Mathematics, Electrical and Bio-medical Engineering, Neurosciences, and a fellow of the Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology. He is on the editorial boards for the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications, the ACM Computing Surveys, and the SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and a fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM).

Abstract: Discoveries in computational molecular – cell biology and bioinformatics promise to provide new therapeutic interventions to disease. With the rapid growth of sequence and structural information for thousands of proteins, and hundreds of cell types computational processing are a restricting factor in obtaining quantitative understanding of molecular-cellular function. Processing and analysis is necessary both for input data (often from imaging) and simulation results. To make biological conclusions, this data must be input to and combined with results from computational analysis and simulations. Furthermore, as parallelism is increasingly prevalent, utilizing the available processing power is essential to development of scalable solutions needed for realistic scientific inquiry. However, complex image processing and even simulations performed on large clusters, multi-core CPU, GPU-type parallelization means that naïve cache unaware algorithms may not efficiently utilize available hardware. Future gains thus require improvements to a core suite of algorithms underpinning the data processing, simulation, optimization and visualization needed for scientific discovery. In this talk, I shall highlight current progress on these algorithms as well as provide several challenges for the visualization community.

Tutorial I: Time-Dependent Flow Visualization

(three hours = 180 mins. in total, incl. breaks)

Tutorial abstract:

Vector fields are a common representation of many kinds of dynamic phenomena in a large variety of application fields. A particularly interesting class of vector fields represent time-dependent flows, i.e., flows where the vectors change over time themselves. A lot of good and relevant research work has been done on the question of how to visualize such unsteady vector fields and an overview is presented in this tutorial. In particularly, we emphasize Lagrangian methods, space-time domain approaches, and interactive visual analysis as three interesting and promising types of methodology. The tutorial is also introduced with some general remarks, in particular also on the question of why it often is not straight forward to extend methods that originally were developed for steady flows to the domain of unsteady flows. A number of examples illustrate the overview.

Tutorial speakers (alphabetically sorted, speaker bios further below):

  • Helwig Hauser (HH), Univ. of Bergen, Norway
  • Alexander Kuhn (AK), Univ. of Magdeburg, Germany
  • Armin Pobitzer (AP), Univ. of Bergen, Norway
  • Maik Schulze (MSch), Univ. of Magdeburg, Germany

Tutorial structure (3 parts, 2 breaks of 10 mins. each):

Part 1 (~55 mins.):
  • Opening (HH et al., ~5 mins.)
  • Introduction (HH et al., ~20 mins.)
  • General Methods (AP & AK, ~30 mins.)
Part 2 (~50 mins.):
  • Lagrangian Methods (AP & AK, ~35 mins.)
  • Space-time Methods (MSch, ~25 mins.)
Part 3 (~45 mins.):
  • Interactive Visual Analysis (HH, ~30 mins.)
  • WrapUp (HH et al., ~15 mins.)

Tutorial Slides

The slides of this tutorial are available as PDF files from the following web page: www.SemSeg.eu. You may contact Helwig Hauser (home page www.ii.UiB.no/vis) or any other of the tutorial speakers for additional information.

Main Reference:

Armin Pobitzer, Ronald Peikert, Raphael Fuchs, Benjamin Schindler, Alexander Kuhn, Holger Theisel, Kresimir Matkovic, and Helwig Hauser: The State of the Art in Topology-Based Visualization of Unsteady Flow. Computer Graphics Forum 30:1789-1811 (2011). doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8659.2011.01901.x

Speaker bios:

Helwig Hauser graduated from Vienna University of Technology in Austria with the degrees of a Dipl.-Ing. and Dr.techn. (PhD) in 1995 and 1998, respectively, where he also worked as an assistant professor at the Institute of Computer Graphics from 1994 until mid 2000. Afterward, he joined the newly founded VRVis Research Center in Vienna, Austria, as a key researcher in the field of visualization. In 2003, he became the scientific director of VRVis (www.VRVis.at) for four years. Since 2007, he is a professor at the University of Bergen, Norway, where he was building up a new research group on visualization (www.ii.UiB.no/vis). His interests are diverse in visualization and computer graphics, including interactive visual analysis (visual analytics), illustrative visualization, scientific and information visualization, and also the integration of both, as well as the application of visualization to many different domain problems.

Alexander Kuhn is a Ph.D. candidate at the Faculty of Informatics, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, where he recieved his MS (Diplom-Ingenieur) in Computational Visualistics in 2009. His research interests include time-dependent flow visualization, Lagrangian measures and sketch-based 3D modeling.

Armin Pobitzer is a last-year PhD candidate at the Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway. He received his M.Sc. (Diplom-Ingenieur) in Technical Mathematics in 2009 from University of Innsbruck, Austria. His research interests include feature extraction and segmentation for flow visualization.

Maik Schulze studied at the Otto-von-Guericke-University in Magdeburg, Germany, and received his degree of a Dipl.-Ing. in Computational Visualistics in 2010. Ever since, he has been a Ph.D. student at the Visual Computing research group headed by Holger Theisel in Magdeburg. His main research interests are flow visualization and computer graphics.

Tutorial II: Interactive Visual Text Analytics and its Evaluation

(two hours = 120 mins. in total, incl. breaks)

Tutorial Abstract:

Today, we live amidst seas of data, including news articles, academic publications, emails, patient records, Facebook network, search logs, and customer related data. In many lines of work, we are often required to swiftly analyze overwhelming amounts of disparate, conflicting, and dynamic data as part of our jobs. The field of visual analytics seeks to provide people with better and more effective ways to understand and analyze large datasets, while also enabling them to act upon their findings immediately. In this tutorial, we will cover various visual text analytics techniques with several application examples, which illustrate the exiting potential of current visual analysis techniques. We will also cover general evaluation techniques involving users, which are essential for validating the visual text analytics techniques.

Tutorial structure (2 parts, 1 break of 10 mins.):

Part 1 (~50 mins. by Shixia Liu):
  • Dynamic Word Cloud
  • Topic-based Visual Text Summarization
  • TextFlow: Towards Better Understanding of Evolving Topics in Text
Part 2 (~50 mins. by Jinwook Seo):
  • Interaction Design for Text Visualization
  • Evaluation Techniques Involving Users

Speaker bios:

Dr. Shixia Liu is a lead researcher in the Internet Graphics Group at Microsoft Research Asia. Before she joined MSRA, She worked as a research staff member and research manager at IBM China Research Lab, where she managed the departments of Smart Visual Analytics and User Experience. Her research interests include interactive, visual text analytics and interactive, visual social network analysis. She is program co-chair of VINCI'2012. She was in the program committee of PacificVis, ACM Multimedia, SDM, and IUI, VINCI, IVAPP, and the guest editor of ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology.

Dr. Jinwook Seo is an Assistant Professor in the School of Computer Science and Engineering at Seoul National University in Korea. He founded the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory there in 2009. His research interests include Human-Computer Interaction, Information Visualization, and Biomedical Informatics. He received his BS and MS degrees in Computer Science from Seoul National University in 1995 and 1997, respectively, after which he taught Computer Science courses to cadets at Korea Air Force Academy for three years. He later worked with Ben Shneiderman at the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, University of Maryland and earned his PhD in Computer Science in 2005. He received the Long-term Impact Award at IEEE VisWeek Discovery Exhibition in 2009 for his work on the Hierarchical Clustering Explorer. He has served on conference organization and program committees such as IEEE VisWeek and IEEE PacificVis.

Session 1. Information Visualization and Visual Analytics

Exploring the Design Space of Composite Visualization

  • Waqas Javed, Purdue University
  • Niklas Elmqvist, Purdue University

Topological Analysis and Visualization of Cyclical Behavior in Memory Reference Traces

  • A.N.M. Imroz Choudhury, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah
  • Bei Wang, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah
  • Paul Rosen, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah
  • Valerio Pascucci, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah

A Network‐Based Interface for the Exploration of High‐Dimensional Data Spaces

  • Zhiyuan Zhang, Stony Brook University
  • Kevin T. McDonnell, Dowling College
  • Klaus Mueller, Stony Brook University

Progressive Parallel Coordinates

  • René Rosenbaum, University of California, Davis
  • Jian Zhi, Columbia University, NY
  • Bernd Hamann, University of California, Davis

Session 2. Time and Space (Spatiotemporal Data)

Embedding, Clustering and Coloring for Dynamic Maps

  • Yifan Hu, AT&T Labs -- Research
  • Stephen G. Kobourov, University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Sankar Veeramoni, University of Arizona, Tucson

Spatiotemporal Anomaly Detection through Visual Analysis of Geolocated Twitter Messages

  • Dennis Thom, Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Harald Bosch, Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Steffen Koch, Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Michael Wörner, Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Thomas Ertl, Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems, University of Stuttgart, Germany

Analyzing the Evolution of Large Scale Structures in the Universe with Velocity Based Methods

  • Uliana Popov, UCSC
  • Eddy Chandra, UCSC
  • Katrin Heitmann, ANL
  • Salman Habibm ANL
  • James Ahrens, LANL
  • Alex Pang, UCSC

Analysis and Visualization of Temporal Changes in Bloggers' Activities and Interests

  • Masahiko Itoh, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo
  • Naoki Yoshinaga, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo
  • Masashi Toyoda, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo
  • Masaru Kitsuregawa, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo

Session 3. Graph Visualization

SideKnot: Revealing Relation Patterns for Graph Visualization

  • Dichao Peng, Zhejiang University, China
  • Neng Lu, Zhejiang University, China
  • Wei Chen, Zhejiang University, China
  • Qunsheng Peng, Zhejiang University, China

A Maxent‐Stress Model for Graph Layout

  • Emden R. Gansner, AT&T Labs ‐‐ Research
  • Yifan Hu, AT&T Labs ‐‐ Research
  • Stephen North, AT&T Labs ‐‐ Research

Numerical Optimization‐Based Graph Drawing Revisited

  • Hiroshi Hosobe, National Institute of Informatics, Japan

The Mental Map and Memorability in Dynamic Graphs

  • Daniel Archambault, Clique Strategic Research Cluster, University College Dublin
  • Helen C. Purchase, School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

Session 4. Vector Fields and Flow Visualization I

Effects of Illumination, Texture, and Motion on Task Performance in 3D Tensor‐Field Streamtube Visualizations

  • Devon Penney, Brown University
  • Jian Chen, University of Southern Mississippi
  • David Laidlaw, Brown University

Visual 4D MRI Blood Flow Analysis with Line Predicates

  • Silvia Born, University of Leipzig
  • Matthias Pfeifle, University Hospital Tübingen
  • Michael Markl, Northwestern University Chicago
  • Gerik Scheuermann, University of Leipzig

A Statistics‐based Dimension Reduction of the Space of Path Line Attributes for Interactive Visual Flow Analysis

  • Armin Pobitzer, University of Bergen, Norway
  • Alan Lež, VRVis Research Center in Vienna, Austria
  • Krešimir Matković, VRVis Research Center in Vienna, Austria
  • Helwig Hauser, University of Bergen, Norway

A Benchmark for Evaluating FTLE Computations

  • Alexander Kuhn, University of Magdeburg
  • Christian Rössl, University of Magdeburg
  • Tino Weinkauf, Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Saarbrücken
  • Holger Theisel, University of Magdeburg

Session 5. Vector Fields and Flow Visualization II

Dense Flow Visualization using Wave Interference

  • Victor Matvienko, IVDA
  • Jens Krüger ‐ IVDA, DFKI, Intel VCI, SCI

Output‐Coherent Image‐Space LIC for Surface Flow Visualization

  • Jin Huang, State Key Lab of CAD&CG, Zhejiang University
  • Wenjie Pei, State Key Lab of CAD&CG, Zhejiang University
  • Chunfeng Wen, State Key Lab of CAD&CG, Zhejiang University
  • Guoning Chen, The University of Utah
  • Wei Chen, State Key Lab of CAD&CG, Zhejiang University
  • Hujun Bao, State Key Lab of CAD&CG, Zhejiang University

A Flow‐Guided File Layout for Out‐Of‐Core Streamline Computation

  • Chun‐Ming Chen, The Ohio State University
  • Lijie Xu, The Ohio State University
  • Teng‐Yok Lee, The Ohio State University
  • Han‐Wei Shen, The Ohio State University

As‐Perpendicular‐as‐Possible Surfaces for Flow Visualization

  • Maik Schulze, University of Magdeburg
  • Christian Rössl, University of Magdeburg
  • Tobias Germer, University of Magdeburg, think‐cell Software GmbH
  • Holger Theisel, University of Magdeburg

Session 6. Volume Rendering and Illustration

Volume Rendering with Multidimensional Peak Finding

  • Natallia Kotava, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany
  • Aaron Knoll, Argonne National Laboratory, USA
  • Mathias Schott, University of Utah, USA
  • Christoph Garth, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany
  • Xavier Tricoche, Purdue University, USA
  • Christoph Kessler, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany
  • Elaine Cohen, University of Utah, USA
  • Charles D. Hansen, University of Utah, USA
  • Michael E. Papka, Argonne National Laboratory, USA
  • Hans Hagen, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany

Combined Surface and Volumetric Occlusion Shading

  • Mathias Schott, University of Utah
  • Tobias Martin, University of Utah
  • A.V. Pascal Grosset, University of Utah
  • Carson Brownlee, University of Utah
  • Thomas Höllt. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Benjamin P. Brown, University of Wisconsin
  • Sean T. Smith, University of Utah
  • Charles D. Hansen, University of Utah

Interference Microscopy Volume Illustration for Biomedical Data

  • Hanqi Guo, Key Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), and School of EECS, Peking University; Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Peking University
  • Xiaoru Yuan, Key Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), and School of EECS, Peking University; Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Peking University
  • Jie Liu, Key Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), and School of EECS, Peking University
  • Guihua Shan, Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Science
  • Xuebin Chi, Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Science
  • Fei Sun, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Science

Intelligent Cutaway Illustrations

  • Stephan Sigg, ETH Zurich
  • Raphael Fuchs, ETH Zurich
  • Robert Carnecky, ETH Zurich
  • Ronald Peikert, ETH Zurich

Uncertainty Visualization in HARDI based on Ensembles of ODFs

  • Fangxiang Jiao, The Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah
  • Jeff M. Phillips, The School of Computing, University of Utah
  • Yaniv Gur, The Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah
  • Christopher R. Johnson, The Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah

Session 7. Visualization in Medicine and Natural Sciences

FluoRender: An Application of 2D Image Domain Methods for 3D and 4D Confocal Microscopy Data Visualization in Neurobiology Research

  • Yong Wan, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute at University of Utah
  • Hideo Otsuna, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at University of Utah
  • Chi‐Bin Chien, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at University of Utah
  • Charles Hansen, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute at University of Utah

Object‐Space Ambient Occlusion for Molecular Dynamics

  • Sebastian Grottel, Visualization Research Center, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Michael Krone, Visualization Research Center, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Katrin Scharnowski, Visualization Research Center, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Thomas Ertl, Visualization Research Center, University of Stuttgart, Germany

Implicit Representation of Molecular Surfaces

  • Julius Parulek, Dep. of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway
  • Ivan Viola, Dep. of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

Visualization of Material Interface Stability

  • Harald Obermaier, University of California, Davis
  • Fang Chen, University of Kaiserslautern
  • Hans Hagen, University of Kaiserslautern
  • Kenneth I. Joy, University of California, Davis

Centerline Reformations of Complex Vascular Structures

  • Gabriel Mistelbauer, Vienna University of Technology
  • Andrej Varchola, Vienna University of Technology
  • Hamed Bouzari, Austrian Academy of Science
  • Juraj Starinsky, Comenius University, Bratislava
  • Arnold Köchl, KFJ Hospital Vienna
  • Rüdiger Schernthaner, Medical University of Vienna
  • Dominik Fleischmann, Stanford University
  • Eduard Gröller, Vienna University of Technology
  • Milos Sramek, Austrian Academy of Science

Posters

An Interactive Visualization Technique for Access Patterns of Web Sites

  • Makiko Kawamoto, Ochanomizu University
  • Takayuki Itoh, Ochanomizu University

A Visualization Technique for System Logs Realizing Overview and Compression

  • Aki Hayashi, Ochanomizu University
  • Takayuki Itoh, Ochanomizu University

Shape-Based Transfer Function Design Using Heat Kernel

  • Krishna Chaitanya Gurijala, Stony Brook University
  • Lei Wang, Stony Brook University
  • Arie Kaufman, Stony Brook University

Heat Map Lens: Interactive Technique for Visualizing Multi-Attribute Time-Series Data

  • Ryo Matsushita, The University of Tokyo
  • Yasuhiro Hashimoto, The University of Tokyo
  • Koji Okamoto, The University of Tokyo

Data Layout and Level-of-Detail Control for Flood Data Visualization upon Maps

  • Sayaka Yagi, Ochanomizu University
  • Takayuki Itoh, Ochanomizu University
  • Mayumi Kurokawa, Toshiba Corporation
  • Yuuichi Izu, Toshiba Corporation
  • Takahisa Yoneyama, Toshiba Corporation
  • Takashi Kohara, Toshiba Corporation

Visualization of Movie Recommender System using Distribution Maps

  • Doi Kim, Ajou University
  • Hyoran Park, Ajou University
  • Junekyu Sim, Ajou University
  • Sunyeong Park, Ajou University
  • Kyungwon Lee, Ajou University

Visualization of Color Harmony

  • Lei Wang, Stony Brook University
  • Arie Kaufman, Stony Brook University

Spectral Clustering based Dimension Sorting in Parallel Coordinates Plot

  • Xin Zhao, Stony Brook University
  • Arie Kaufman, Stony Brook University

Real-Time CUDA Numerical Integration and Differentiation of Earthquake Ground-Motion Volume Data

  • Ming-Da Chen, National Taipei University of Technology
  • Tung-Ju Hsieh, National Taipei University of Technology

Circle Bills: an Visualization for the Smart Grid

  • Ji Hwan Park, Stony Brook University
  • Arie Kaufman, Stony Brook University

Prostate Visualization with Overlapping Regions of Interest

  • Joseph Marino, Stony Brook University
  • Arie Kaufman, Stony Brook University

Body-driven Navigation for 3D Visualization using NuNav3D

  • Charilaos Papadopoulos, Stony Brook University
  • Daniel Sugarman, Stony Brook University
  • Arie Kaufman, Stony Brook University

A Projection-Based Method for Interactive Visual Exploration of Complex Graphs in A Three-Dimensional Space

  • Masanori Takami, Tokyo Institute of Technology
  • Hiroshi Hosobey, National Institute of Informatics
  • Ken Wakitaz, Tokyo Institute of Technology/Japan Science and Technology Agency

Stochastic Approach for Integrated Rendering of Volumes and Semi-transparent polygons on a High-resolution Display System

  • Naohisa Sakamoto, Kyoto University
  • Jun Nishimura, Kyoto University
  • Koji Koyamada, Kyoto University

Efficient Indexing for Hierarchical Mixed Lattices

  • Kaloian Petkov, Stony Brook University
  • Arie Kaufman, Stony Brook University

Designing Octilinear Layouts for Customized Metro Maps

  • Hsiang-Yun Wu, The University of Tokyo
  • Shigeo Takahashi, The University of Tokyo
  • Chun-Cheng Lin, National Taiwan University
  • Hsu-Chun Yen, National Taiwan University